Franki Raden & Indonesia National Orchestra

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FOUNDATION

VISION

For the past several decades, we have witnessed that musical practice in the global arena has moved away from its roots and original function as one of the most significant human expressions to deal with the deepest values of humanity such as social communication, cultural interaction, ritual and spiritualism. The academic world has led music into the field of sheer intellectual pursuit; and the industrial world has reduced music into a sheer commodity. As a result, at the turn of millennium musical practices around the globe arrived at the crucial stage of losing the aforementioned capacity.

Yet entering the third millennium the world seems to need a new creative impulse that can nurture the international musical scene for another several hundred years. For the past few hundred years, Western symphony orchestra has contributed significantly to the progress of our civilization. The orchestra has been able to stimulate the birth of thousands of musical works that created a new musical culture in every corner of the world. Thank to European cultures and musicians, through Western symphony orchestra many peoples from across the globe can be united and celebrated life and happiness together under the same cultural umbrella.

However, the era of European symphony orchestra has come to an end. The development of 20th century orchestral music has turned into a dead end. The music became highly elitist and has alienated ordinary people, especially those who live outside of European high culture circle. Music has ceased to be a communication tool, cultural interaction and spiritual endeavor. It is no longer part of human civilization.

Today is the time to rethink how we could communicate better globally through music. It is crucial for us to find the most suitable musical language that can fulfill the aforementioned sacred mission. Fortunately, by the beginning of this 21st century we witnessed the emergence of interesting musical phenomenon i.e., musicians across the globe simultaneously began to approach musical expression from their own cultural perspectives. Therefore, it is not just coincident that at the beginning of the 21st century many musicians simultaneously engaged in indigenizing and contextualizing music within their own cultures. For this reason, world music can be treated as an ideal starting point for approaching the most fundamental musical challenge of our 21st century i.e., seeking a musical language that can function best to connect various societies and cultures in the world. First and foremost, we should start by laying the new foundation for a global indigenous music education.

Many prominent musicians in the world are aware about this critical condition. However, their individual endeavors, here and there, to reclaim the aforementioned musical capacity can only work at the minimum level. For this reason, we are planning to unify and intensify all the efforts to regain the power of music in dealing with the deepest value of humanity in the form of Symphony Orchestra consisting of indigenous instruments from across the globe.

MISSION

  • found center for research and development of world music cultures.
  • To preserve and maintain the diversity of world music in the global arena.
  • To develop sustainable cultural resources for the new millennium musical expression.
  • To create a forum for global collaboration among indigenous musicians across the continents.
  • To develop system of world music education in international level.
  • To form World Music Orchestra that represents indigenous instruments and cultures of the world.
  • To open new musical horizon for the new millennium.

PROJECT
As one of the countries that possess incredibly rich and most diverse musical instruments and cultures, Indonesia took the initiative to fulfill this important millennial mission. For this very reason, we have initiated the establishment of new symphony orchestra consisting of indigenous musical instruments called THE INDONESIAN NATIONAL ORCHESTRA or INO.

INO is open for any indigenous instrumentalists around the world to join the orchestra as members. Although the orchestra is based in Indonesia, INO has a global mission as a new musical vehicle for any talented musicians to create a new symphonic music culture of the millennium. INO is set to open a new cultural horizon in the international musical scene by challenging musicians across the globe to compose symphonic works for this particular new orchestra. Through INO, the world would soon witness the most dynamic and productive encounter of musicians and music cultures on earth ever.

II

bio

Franki Raden is a prominent Indonesian composer and ethnomusicologist who has been working in local and international music scenes for the past 30 years. His works have been performed in Indonesia, Japan, United States and Canada.

In 1978 and 1986 he received the Best Film Music awards (Piala Citra) for his scores in November 1828 and Nagabonar. In 1986, he received a visiting composer grant from Asian Cultural Council to live in New York City. Recently, he was invited by Civitella Ranieri Foundation to be a composer in resident in Umbria, Italy.

In 2001, Raden received his doctoral degree in Ethnomusicology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His articles have been published in various prestigious Indonesian as well as international music periodicals such as Kompas, Tempo, The Jakarta Post, The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, The World of Music, Osterreichische Musik Zeitschrift and GengoBunka (Language and Culture).

From 2004-2005 and 2006-2007, he taught respectively at York University and University of Toronto, Canada. In 2008, he was a Visiting Fellow at the Southeast Asian Studies Programme, National University of Singapore. In 2010, he founded and directed Indonesian National Orchestra (INO), a 40-piece orchestra consisting of indigenous musical instrumen

Franki Raden is a prominent Indonesian composer and ethnomusicologist who has been working in local and international music scenes for the past 30 years. His works have been performed in Indonesia, Japan, United States and Canada.

In 1978 and 1986 he received the Best Film Music awards (Piala Citra) for his scores in November 1828 and Nagabonar. In 1986, he received a visiting composer grant from Asian Cultural Council to live in New York City. Recently, he was invited by Civitella Ranieri Foundation to be a composer in resident in Umbria, Italy.

In 2001, Raden received his doctoral degree in Ethnomusicology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His articles have been published in various prestigious Indonesian as well as international music periodicals such as Kompas, Tempo, The Jakarta Post, The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, The World of Music, Osterreichische Musik Zeitschrift and GengoBunka (Language and Culture).

From 2004-2005 and 2006-2007, he taught respectively at York University and University of Toronto, Canada. In 2008, he was a Visiting Fellow at the Southeast Asian Studies Programme, National University of Singapore. In 2010, he founded and directed Indonesian National Orchestra (INO), a 40-piece orchestra consisting of indigenous musical instrumen

source : http://www.indonesiannationalorchestra.org/index.php

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